Tag Archives: Amber Snail

Bear Creek Park: Eggs to Fledglings, Caterpillars to Butteflies, Everything Just Keeps Growing!

 

Spiderwort, a native wildflower, blooms in profusion even in the garden at the center of the parking lot at Bear Creek Nature Park!

June is an easy month to love. In the early weeks, May’s buds transformed into blooms. Turtles and dragonflies emerged from the ponds. Butterfly and grasshopper eggs hatched into caterpillars and tiny nymphs. May migrators and some year-round birds completed their nests and were busily laying eggs.

Cam at Tree Swallow nest box. Photo by V. Morganti

And then came really warm days – or even some very hot days this year! –  and by the end of the month, life had quickly moved on. The spring blooms produced their seeds and subsided as the summer flowers began to emerge. Bees buzz along the trails. Dragonflies dominate the open meadows and wetlands. Damselflies, like colorful, winged sticks, pause briefly by the pond and other strange flying creatures hunt in the shade. The fledglings emerge from nests, awkward and downy, begging to be fed by exhausted parents. So much to see that I find myself rushing from park to park, trying not to miss anything! So here’s just a selection of what came my way at Bear Creek Nature Park during the first month of summer.

Early to Mid-June:  Brave Beginnings

The Bear Creek Wetlands in Early June

So much happens near the wetlands as summer begins. Two nests graced either side of the viewing deck at the Center Pond. On the west side, high above the water, a Baltimore Oriole’s (Icterus galbula) carefully woven sack swayed with every breeze, rocking either the female brooding her eggs or a cuddle of nestlings with every breeze. While we birders watched one Wednesday morning, the female arrived at the nest and disappeared into it, followed by the attentive male. This lovely photo of the male arriving at the nest was taken by Ewa Mutzenmore, a member of our group.

The male Baltimore Oriole arrives at the nest. Photo by E. Mutzenmore of the birding group.

He gave us the eye as he leaned in to feed either his brooding mate or perhaps their nestlings.

The male Oriole keeping an eye on the camera.

And then, tail up, evidently unfazed, he proceeded to stuff foraged insects into a waiting beak below.

Tail up, the male oriole feeds his nestlings or his mate who arrived before him.

Ewa, whose Oriole photo is above, mentioned having seen a very large Northern Water Snake  (Nerodia sipedon) swimming away at the pond when she was there last and suddenly Ben VanderWeide, our Natural Areas Stewardship Manager, spotted it! Its long, thick body was wound around the branches of a willow bush just west of the dock. Though not venomous, I wouldn’t advise picking one up or harassing it; it will bite and spray you with musk to defend itself. Unfortunately, Ewa and I both could only come up with a photo of parts of its winding body; it just didn’t move a muscle. But here’s a link where you can see a photo of its dark brown head. The birds are evidently safe from it, though fish,frogs, and salamanders better beware!

The body of a large, but non-venomous, Northern Water Snake wound into a bush limb near the Center Pond.

As I approached the pond on a later afternoon, another impressive predator rose like a submarine from the silvery pond.  A large Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina) up-periscoped to check me out.  Isn’t their snout a curious shape?  It’s more important to be cautious around Snappers when they’re on land than in the water, because they do bite if threatened and have extremely long necks. And generally, they’re on land to lay eggs.

The head of a female Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) popped out of the bushes for a look around before she winged down and disappeared into her nest in a small tree just east of the dock. (Click on photos to enlarge; hover cursor for captions.)

 

Over in the playground pond, a tiny (about silver-dollar-sized!) Painted Turtle (Chrysemys picta) climbed onto a log for probably one of its first basks in a spot of sunlight.

A silver-dollar-sized Painted Turtle learns the fine art of sun basking.

As I approached the dock one cloudy day, a lone male Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) stood forlornly gazing out at the water from a floating log, not a mate in sight.  When he heard my approach, his beautiful head twisted toward me with a  stare that implied he’d prefer to be alone. Then he dropped into the water and glided away.

A lone, male Mallard notices me with some misgivings about my presence.

When he departed, a much tinier male landed on the dock, the Dot-tailed Whiteface Dragonfly (Leucorrhinia intacta), whose name says it all!  I get a huge kick out of his Mickey Mouse-style face.

A male Dot-tailed Whiteface looks for prey or a mate at the edge of the Center Pond dock.

At Draper Twin Lake Park a few weeks ago, I’d seen the female Dot-tailed Whiteface, who is more elegant, if less amusing.

A female Dot-tailed Whiteface dragonfly near the marsh at Draper Twin Lake park.

And one Sunday morning, while scanning Bear Creek marsh, I heard the unmistakable whinnying call of a Sora (Porzana carolina), a bird that tends to be heard and not seen. This secretive bird is evidently abundant according to Cornell Ornithology Lab, but likes to stay hidden deep in the cattails and reeds. Looking at this photo by inaturalist.org photographer by Mike Baird, you’d never guess that such a chunky bird with stubby wings had migrated here from Central or South America! And check out those feet!

A Sora as photographed by a gifted and generous photographer on iNaturalist.org, Mike Baird. (CC BY)

Several strangely beautiful insects shelter or hunt in shady spots near wetlands, too.

A male Orchard Oriole (Icterus spurius) appeared for the birders at the top of the southern hill away from the wetlands, though they sometime nest along the edges of marshes and rivers. This poor fellow seemed wildly distracted by some itchy insect, probably Feather Mites (super family Analgoidea) which often infest nests in early summer. He just barely stopped preening for a moment! As a victim of biting midges in spring, I could sympathize!

Sun and Shade Meant Blooms, Juicy Leaves – and More Insects!

Closeup of a tiny Monarch Butterfly caterpillar munching on a leaf of Common Milkweed.

The birders saw four Monarch Butterfly caterpillars (Danaus plexippus)  – one of them above – munching contentedly on leaves of  Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca). It’s wonderful to know that natural areas management of our parks makes them places where milkweed gets ever more plentiful – and that, as a result,  migrating monarchs find their way here to lay their eggs  for the next generation.

Nearby, the tiniest of Black-legged Grasshopper nymphs (Melanoplus femurnigrumsat quietly enough that I could a good look at this little one, less than a half inch long! It’ll probably molt 4 more times before it reaches adulthood.  Pretty special eyes, eh?

A tiny grasshopper nymph watches the lens carefully as I take a closeup.

Twelve-spotted Skimmer (Libellula pulchella) found a budding stem to be the perfect place to pause and scan us birders and the prey we might have stirred up as we walked among the plants in the parking circle.

A Twelve-spotted dragonfly pauses in the garden at the center of the parking lot.

In the native gardens near the parking lot and along the Walnut Lane in the center of the park, early June brought colorful blossoms and the seeds of early spring flowers that  were already maturing their seeds for next year’s crop inside their fruits. Such a variety of colors and shapes! (Use pause button for time to read captions.)

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A Late June Visit To See What Had Changed

Wow!  The shy flowers of late spring and early summer had been replaced by the big, bold native milkweeds. Monarch caterpillars seem to have finished munching on Common Milkweed leaves and spun their chrysalises; some have yet to emerge and some may already be flying. Butterfly Milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa) is ready to host any number of butterflies this summer. If you’re looking for color in your garden, Butterfly Milkweed’s a nice native choice because it remains an attractive bunch instead of spreading like Common Milkweed – and pollinators find milkweeds irresistible!

Mites must still be giving birds a hard time, though.  This itchy little Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) preened just as insistently as the poor Orchard Oriole earlier in the month! This gnatcatcher is small, only a bit larger than a hummingbird and smaller than a wren and can be identified by its white-edged tail. According to Cornell Lab, they sometimes build up to seven nests in a season because they frequently give up a nest due to mites, predators and problems with Cowbirds and others that lay eggs in their nests. Hope this little one persists despite all those tribulations!

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On the western slope, an adult Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) and its fledgling paused in a bush. The adult looked around checking for trouble, then hopped onto the ground, looking for seeds or insects to feed the youngster. The youngster hopped clumsily in the bush, waiting for its parent return, which fortunately resulted in something to eat!

The American Goldfinches (Spinus tristis) wait until late June or July to begin their families. They will use the fluffy pappus from thistles and other plants to line their nest and they feed on the thistle’s seeds, a favorite food. It looked as though this couple was already making the most of these Field Thistles (Cirsium arvense) that are just getting started.

This pair of American Goldfinches is just beginning its breeding season.

A bit later in the Eastern Meadow, a Halloween Pennant Dragonfly (Celithemis eponina) was coping with a stiff breeze by holding tight and adjusting its wing positions to stay aloft.  This one could be looking for a mate; maybe that’s why it was working so hard to stay visible on a bare perch above the wildflowers.  Once it finds a mate, they’ll both head to the nearest wetland where the female will dip her abdomen into the water, leaving eggs behind.

A Halloween Pennant Dragonfly adjusting its wings in a brisk wind

The Black-legged grasshopper nymphs had changed a bit when I made my last visit. This one now had a bit more black-legged-ness! I assume it had gone through its second molt. I didn’t take a closeup of this one so you could see how tiny these nymphs really are.

The wetlands, as usual, were full of life too. A juvenile Green Frog (Rana clamitans) had left  its youth as a tadpole behind and was sitting waiting for the nearest flying insect at the Playground Pond. The green dots are Water Meal (g. Wolffia) which covers the playground pond along with spots of Common Duckweed (Lemna minor) – aptly named since ducks do scoop up both plants and make a meal out of them!

Nearby, a tiny Amber Snail (G. Succinea) snacked delicately on the seeds of Orchard Grass (Dactylis glomerata). I wonder if those black spots on the blossoms are places where the snail has secreted extra slime to stay attached while eating?

An Amber Snail munches on seeds of Orchard Grass.

While monitoring a vernal pool at Bear Creek, the crew brought up a tiny Crayfish (family Cambaridae). It was too tiny to determine a species but it certainly had all of the equipment it needed for surviving in its underwater world.  Crayfish molt six to ten times in their first year, so this one has a long way to go before adulthood!

A tiny crayfish from a vernal pool. It will molt 6-10 times in its first year.

It was the Best of Times, It was the Worst of Times…

A bumblebee head down in an unusual white blossom of Common Milkweed

Summer is glorious, right?  Who could argue with that?  All the blossoms, birds, whispering leaves and yellow sunlight pouring over it all.  Or as the poet,  e.e. cummings so ebulliently put it, “the leaping greenly spirits of trees/and a blue true dream of sky; and …everything/which is natural which is infinite which is yes.”

But I wonder sometimes if migrating birds, for example, might grouse a bit about cummings’ enthusiasm and ours. Summer is a busy, hard-working time for birds! I’ve become so aware of this by monitoring bluebirds this summer and it’s true of all birds, really. First there are courtship rituals that can involve singing constantly for hours. A diminutive House Wren (Troglodytes aedon) or the Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) may sing their territorial/courting songs a hundred, even a thousand times in a day! Nest-making often involves long days or even a solid week of gathering material and then weaving, or scraping, or even digging a safe place for their eggs. And once eggs hatch, their young sit begging in the nest and later from every branch, crying “MORE FOOD!” Imagine having young every summer, frequently multiple broods of young,  and working constantly to be sure at least some of them survive despite predators of all kinds – plus coping with those miserable feather mites!

And yet, thank goodness, they return to us each year to go through it all because the show must go on! The genes must be passed to a new generation! I’ve come to admire the sheer tenacity of nature in facing the vicissitudes of life without homes in which to retreat at night or when the weather is harsh. Learning more about the threats and difficulties that birds overcome, I’m doubly pleased to see them with their breasts turned to the sun on a cool morning, or to hear their quiet evensong calls around me as the sky grows dark. They seem to still be able to pause now and then from all the hubbub of their lives and just “be” for a few moments. I take that as a lesson for my busy life – and probably yours too.

Footnote: My sources for information, besides Oakland Township's Stewardship Manager Ben VanderWeide, are as follows: inaturalist.org;Allaboutbirds.org, the website of the Cornell Ornithology Lab at Cornell University; Wikipedia; Herbarium of the University of Michigan at michiganflora.net; various Michigan Field Guides by Stan Tekiela;Butterflies of Michigan Field Guide by Jaret C. Daniels,  A Guide to Bird Behavior Vols.1-3 by Donald W and Lillian Q.Stokes, the passionate enthusiasts at the Facebook groups Odonata of the Eastern U.S.and Butterflying Michigan plus others as cited in the text. e.e.cummings poem "I thank You God for most this amazing" in 100 Selected Poems pub. by Grove Press

THIS WEEK AT BEAR CREEK: Story-telling Wildflowers, Solo Fledglings and the Usual Odds ‘n’ Ends

First week of July, the launch point for what I think of as High Summer.

Blog post and photos  by Cam Mannino
Blog post and photos
by Cam Mannino

Though it’s gray and rainy as I write (again!), I’m still anticipating the dry heat of the heart of the season when the Old Fields of Bear Creek are sprinkled with color,  grasses and tall flowers bend and sway in the wind, big nectar-sipping butterflies balance on blossoms and swallows swoop and dive overhead.  Hope springs eternal that we will see more days like the 4th of July weekend, eh?

History as Told by Wildflowers

Botanists use the term “Old Fields” for the largely treeless expanses of Bear Creek when you enter from Snell Road and west of the playground pond.  I love the term because it implies a history and for me, the wildflowers express that history in different ways. Compared to native grasslands, savannas, or prairie, Old Fields typically have an abundance of non-native, often agricultural, plants and a few scattered native plants that recolonized after farming or grazing stopped.

It only makes sense to begin with Michigan’s Native Americans.  Meet Indian Hemp (Apocynum cannabinum).  During its growing season, all parts of this plant are toxic so you and that dog on your leash should leave it alone (in case either of you were tempted to eat it!) What’s historically interesting is that native people figured out that in the fall, when the toxins drained down into the roots, this plant could be harvested usefully. According to Wikipedia, Indian Hemp was  “used as a source of fiber by Native Americans to make hunting nets, fishing lines, clothing, and twine.”   Hemp is still used in similar products today.  I love its dark red stems and tiny white flowers. You’ll find it along the north side of the path that curves down around the vernal pond below the high seating area on the south side of the Park.

indian hemp 1
Native Indian Hemp had many uses for the Indians who harvested it in the fall when the toxins in the plant had drained down into its roots.

When settlers arrived in Michigan, the dry, sunny, sandy soil of these areas of Bear Creek were prairie – tall grasses, a few native trees and native flowering plants.  Those settlers probably saw our native Black-eyed Susan  (Rudbeckia hirta) when they arrived.  And they are still here,  currently growing in profusion up near the benches on the hill at the south end of the park.

Edit:  Ben tells me that many plants in the Aster family (Asteraceae), to which Black-eyed Susans belong, have two different sets of flowers – the big petals are actually individual ray flowers with reproductive parts at the base, and the black center is made of individual disc flowers (the outer ring of disc flowers are flowering in this picture).  Click here for a basic explanation, or here for a more technical explanation. So every apparent “petal,” small and large,  is actually a separate flower, producing its own seed!  Quite an amazing amount of seed production in what looks like one big flower!

black eyed susan
The bright eyes of the native Black-eyed Susan would have been here to greet early settlers.

Another beloved native, Butterfly Milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa) could have greeted those settlers, just as today its hot pink buds burst into orange blossoms in the native bed and here and there in the field west of the Center Pond.  True to its name, last Sunday it hosted a Meadow Fritillary (Boloria bellona).

butterfly milkweed w Meadow fritllary
Native Butterfly Milkweed living up to its name by hosting a Meadow Fritillary.

According to Wikipedia, after the Civil War,  a U.S. farmer and agriculturalist, Timothy Hanson,  is said to have introduced a European grass as a source of  hay and cattle fodder. Today it’s still here and plentiful and is probably named in Mr. Hanson’s honor; it’s called Timothy (Phleum pratense). It’s a beautiful grass but as a European import, it’s less useful to our native wildlife.  Here it is  in flowering mode with showy red anthers (pollen making organs) at Bear Creek at the top of the hill near the seating area again. Like all grasses, Timothy is wind-pollinated and throws copious amounts of pollen to the wind, hoping that a few pollen grains will land on receptive stigmas of another Timothy plant (stigmas are part of the “female” reproductive structures in plants). Since grasses and other wind-pollinated plants don’t need to advertise to pollinators like insects, birds, or bats, their flowers are not very showy, and sometimes plain hard to see!

timothy Phleum pratense
Non-native Timothy, a European grass brought here to feed sheep and cattle.

After two hot days over the weekend, it had finished flowering for the season, a blessing for folks with spring allergies!

Timothy after seeding
Timothy grass finished flowering by this Monday after a warm weekend.

Timothy and other non-native grasses took the place of tall prairie grasses like Big Blue Stem which is slowly returning to Bear Creek after prescribed burns.  Many of our ground-nesting birds like Pheasants, Meadowlarks and Northern Bobwhites prefer these tall native grasses and losing them, as you’ll hear from me often, reduces the biodiversity we were blessed with here. This fall photo at Seven Ponds Nature Center will give you a feel for the height of this tall native prairie grass that  once flourished in Bear Creek and now is making a comeback .

Big blue stem
Native Big Bluestem growing at Seven Ponds Nature Center

Farmers were still farming here in the 1940’s, of course,  and like the settlers, they needed pasture, hay and silage for their animals.  These days Butterfly Milkweed has to contend with the Birdsfoot Trefoil (Lotus corniculatus),a plant from Eurasia and Northern Africa,  which farmers probably seeded while creating pasture for sheep and cattle.  It’s a lovely plant up close, though this particular specimen could be a cultivar (a garden version) that snuck in among the others which aren’t quite as regular and glamorous.

birdsfoot trefoil
Invasive Birdsfoot Trefoil from Eurasia and Northern Africa crowds out native plants.

But look what happened this year to Butterfly Milkweed in the meadow west of the Center Pond.  You can barely see the orange of the Butterfly Milkweed among the yellow of Birdsfoot Trefoil!

invasive birdfoot trefoil_edited-1
Invasive Birdfoot Trefoil crowding out native Butterfly Milkweed.

Next week, along with this week’s discoveries, I hope to explore the historical “roots” (as it were) of other native and non-native species in the shady areas of Bear Creek.  I never knew how much history was blooming right under  my nose!

Fledglings and Old Friends

If you walk along the lane of Walnuts (Julgans nigra) at the center of Bear Creek early in the morning or late afternoon, you’re likely to see some very small, a bit rough-around-the-edges fledglings off on their first solo explorations, no adult nearby.  These young birds are notoriously hard to identify because their plumage is often quite different from their parent.  For example, I’m 99% sure this is a baby Bluebird (Sialia sialis) we saw on Sunday, because of its white eye ring, brown speckled breast, and most importantly, the blue feathers in its wing and tail – and also because it’s smaller, curious and has a not-quite-finished look.

baby bird ID
A fledgling Bluebird (I think) surveys a walnut tree along the center lane.

But I could be wrong – so feel free to correct me!

Here’s another fledgling high in a walnut tree.  Warblers are particularly hard to identify as fledglings,  but I’m going with a fledgling Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia).

fledgling yellow warbler?

Remember the adult version from an early spring post?

yellow warbler
Yellow Warbler posted earlier this spring.

One of our faithful birds, here summer and winter, was also hopping around the walnut trunks searching for bugs or places to store big, fat seeds.  Here’s the agile White-Breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) in an unusually upright position:

nuthatch right side up
The White-Breasted Nuthatch in a seemingly rare pose – right side up!

More often, you’ll see a Nuthatch foraging upside down like this:

upside down nuthatch
A common way of feeding and exploring for the White-Breasted Nuthatch – upside down!

And a summer visitor was farther out in the small trees just east of the Walnut lane, the russet and black Orchard Oriole (Icterus spurius) with his beautiful yellow-olive mate (not pictured).

male orchard oriole2
The male Orchard Oriole flitted through the small trees with his mate (not pictured) who is yellow and olive green.

Another faithful resident, the American Robin (Turdus migratorius) is beginning a second brood for the year so look for a female, like this one in a red oak this week,  sitting in her nest with just her head and tail showing.

Robin in nest
Robins are beginning their second broods of the season.

Those Odds ‘n’ Ends

In the north marsh, Reg spotted what looked like an upside-down Snapping Turtle  ((Chelydra serpentina), its light lower shell (plastron) exposed and its legs flopping in the air.  It was very far away and we puzzled over the sight through binoculars, until suddenly the turtle righted itself and we saw two turtles turn and swim away from each other!  Apparently we saw mating Snappers which breed between April and November.  Since the distant white blob didn’t make much of a photo, here’s a reminder of the beak-nosed appearance of this prehistoric reptile.

snapper head on_2
We saw two of these amazing Snappers mating in the marsh about a week ago.

I must admit that the Center Pond is at its most homely right now.  I hope you saw the White Water Crowfoot (Ranunculus aquatilis), an aquatic buttercup, in bloom earlier, because now it’s left mats of brown strings across the surface.  But despite that, we laughed at seeing 14 young Green Frogs (Lithobates clamitans), sitting at attention on that brown surface all over the pond, each in their own separate little territory, probably enjoying the sunlight.  The bright yellow belly and the tympanum (a frog’s eardrum) on the cheek  that’s bigger than the eye tells you this is a young male on a log near the deck.

Green frog sunbathing
The tympanum (a frog’s eardrum) that’s larger than its eye and a bright yellow belly means this is a young male Green Frog.

I marvel at the semi-precious stone appearance of the Amber Snail (genus Succineida) who lives in moist areas – like this one, found on a dewy leaf near the playground pond.

snail
The appropriately-named Amber Snail loves moisture!

Coming Attractions:

July is the month for a beloved non-native wildflower, Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota) and the first blooms and buds are beginning to show among all that tall grass.  I’m glad this is one of the non-native plants that can co-exist with our native ones!

Queen Anne blossom closed
A bud of non-native Queen Anne’s Lace which is also called Wild Carrot!

History under our feet, fledglings surveying the park from high in the walnut trees, and all the other pleasures of summer in Bear Creek await you – on the next sunny, breezy summer day that we all hope is just over the horizon!

*Quick footnote:  My sources for information, as well as Oakland Township Stewardship Manager Dr. Ben VanderWeide, are as follows: Stokes Nature Guides:  A Guide to Bird Behavior Volumes 1-3, Allaboutbirds.org, the website of the Cornell Ornithology Lab at Cornell University; Wikipedia; http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org; Herbarium of the University of Michigan at michiganflora.net.; various Michigan Field Guides by Stan Tekiela; Butterflies of Michigan Field Guide by Jaret C. Daniels, and invaluable wildflower identification from local expert, Maryann Whitman.