Tag Archives: Cancer Root

The Secret Life of Parasitic Plants

“Parasite” has a bad connotation. There is something unsettling and a little mysterious about an organism that taps into another to survive. But for me parasitic plants mean beauty and balance … and still a bit of mystery.

A little background about parasitic plants: they can be classified as holoparasites or hemiparasites. Holoparasites don’t produce any chlorophyll and rely on their host plants 100% to get the nutrients they need to survive. It is easy to mistake holoparasites, like the Indian Pipe below, for mushrooms because they are often white or pale-colored. Since they don’t need direct sunlight to survive, holoparasites keep most of the plant structure below ground, only sending flowering stalks aboveground to be pollinated and to disperse seeds. So if you see parasitic plant, it’s a special treat!

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Indian Pipe, Monotropa uniflora, is often mistaken for a mushroom because it lacks chlorophyll.

On the contrary, hemiparasites are still completely green and only derive some of their nutrition from their host plant. Indian paintbrush and mistletoes are hemiparasites you might recognize. Parasitic plants tap into their host plant using a special structure called a haustorium. Check out this link to learn more about parasitic plants.

Why do parasitic plants make me think of balance and beauty? If you’ve ever grown native plants in your garden, you probably noticed that often what seem to be well-behaved plants in your favorite meadow become tall, aggressive, spreading giants! Without the rich, complex connections of an intact natural community, these plants grow like crazy. When I see parasitic plants, it is a sign of the intricate web of connections, above and beneath the soil, among the plants, fungi, insects, birds, mammals, herps, bacteria, and other organisms.

Check out the pictures of more parasitic plants you might see in our Oakland Township parks. Enjoy!

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Cancer root, Orobanche uniflora, growing amid a bed of green violet and aster leaves.
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Common Dodder, Cuscuta gronovii, growing on joe-pye and Canada goldenrod. Dodder taps in to the stem of its host plant, not the root.
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Oaks are the only known host plant for Squaw-Root, Conopholis americana.

Photo(s) of the Week: Some Native Spring Wildflowers Relish “Disturbance”

Golden Alexanders flourishing beneath the trees south of the Wet Prairie on the Paint Creek Trail

Curiously, many native wildflowers like a little disturbance now and then. So township natural areas manager, Dr. Ben VanderWeide, sees that they get just what they need! By eliminating invasive shrubs, native plants grow stronger as sunlight reaches their previously shade-suppressed leaves. Regular prescribed burns help many fire-adapted native species emerge from the seed bank and thrive. The Golden Alexanders (Zizia aurea) along the Paint Creek Trail (seen above) are loving all the upheaval from invasive shrub removal three years ago. Yellow Lady Slippers (Cypripedium parviflorum), and Swamp Buttercups (Ranunculus hispidus) are flourishing for the same reason at Gallagher Creek Park. Native wildflowers are emerging in greater numbers all over Cranberry Lake Park after a recent burn. Below is a small sampling of local native wildflowers which benefit from the Parks Commission’s efforts to restore our natural heritage.

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