Pitcher Perfect

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Blog post by Heather Herndon, Natural Areas Stewardship Technician
Blog post by Heather Herndon, Natural Areas Stewardship Technician

The nutrient-poor conditions of bogs and fens present a challenging environment for plant growth, so some plants have evolved mechanisms to obtain extra nutrients in interesting ways. The three special plants found in these habitats in Michigan are pitcher plants, bladderworts, and sundews. Carnivorous plants have always been a favorite of mine because of their ability to live in extreme environments and thrive by eating insects! It is also really fun to watch slow motion videos of flies being captured by the infamous Venus flytrap!

Pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea) can be found in bogs or fens all over the great state of Michigan, including the bog at Cranberry Lake Park. The highly modified leaves are curved into a pitcher-like shape, thus giving the unique carnivorous plant its name!

pitcher1
The Pitcher Plant has quite a unique flower!

Pitcher plants in particular attract insects with their brightly colored, highly modified “pitcher” leaves that mimic flowers. Insects crawl down into the leaf and get trapped! Downward pointing hairs and a waxy coating on the inside of leaf prevent the insect from escaping, and enzymes produced by bacteria in the liquid at the bottom on the leaf digest the insect. A “pitcher” perfect ending for the plant, but not so much for the insect!

pitcher3
Can you see the fine white hairs on the inside of the leaves?

Have you found a carnivorous plant while walking through a fen or bog in your area? If you have, comment below! We would love to see your photos and hear about your experiences with cool carnivorous plants!

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Plant information was gathered from Michigan DNR and NOHLC websites.

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2 thoughts on “Pitcher Perfect

  1. This is so cool! I never knew we had carnivorous plants around here. Thanks so much! I’ll be on the lookout from now on.

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