All posts by Ben VanderWeide

About Ben VanderWeide

I am the Natural Areas Stewardship Manager for Oakland Township Parks and Recreation in southeast Michigan. I have a doctorate in biology (focused on plant ecology) and I am passionate about protecting and managing natural areas.

Sign up for Volunteer Burn Crew Training – February 24

If you are interested in joining our volunteer burn crew, join us for our training workshop on Saturday, February 24, 9 am – 2:30 pm at the Paint Creek Cider Mill (4480 Orion Road, Rochester, MI 48306). We will cover reasons for using prescribed fire, preparations for conducting a fire, necessary tools, roles of each burn crew member, and ignition patterns. Training is required for new crew members, and a great refresher if you’re returning. Weather permitting we will do a small demonstration or mock burn after lunch. Snacks will be provided, but please bring your own lunch.

RSVP required to bvanderweide@oaklandtownship.org or 248-651-7810 ext. 401 by Thursday, February 22 or sooner.

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Learn about Rain Gardens, Bioswales, and Rain Barrels – Feb 8, 6:30 pm

Join us this Thursday night for our second 2018 Natural Areas Stewardship Talk! Matt Demmon from Plantwise, LLC will discuss “Water as a Resource in Your Landscape.” You won’t want to miss this chance to learn from an experienced professional about rain gardens, rain barrels, bioswales, detention basins, and more. Check out the full description below. This event is free and open to the public. Bring your friends and family!

  • Location: Paint Creek Cider Mill, 4480 Orion Road, Rochester, MI 48306
  • Date: Thursday, February 8
  • Time: 6:30 pm

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Learn about Metro Detroit’s Wild Native Bees – Jan 25, 6:30 pm

Join us tomorrow night for our first 2018 Natural Areas Stewardship Talk! Caleb Wilson from Oakland University will discuss “Ecology and Conservation of Metro Detroit’s Bees: Protecting Native Pollinators in Your Backyard.” Check out the full description below. This event is free and open to the public. Bring your friends and family!

  • Location: Paint Creek Cider Mill, 4480 Orion Road, Rochester, MI 48306
  • Date: Thursday, January 25
  • Time: 6:30 pm

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Photos of the Week: Migrating Fall Birds

Every Wednesday morning the Oakland Township Birders gather at a township park for our weekly bird walk. Chickadees, Cardinals, Tufted Titmice, and Song Sparrows regularly greet us with their songs and antics, while Black-billed Cuckoos, Green Herons, and warblers are a special treat.

During the spring and fall we pay special attention to the birds using our parks as they move between their seasonal homes further north and south. On our walk at Draper Twin Lake Park this week we got great looks at a Hermit Thrush foraging quietly on juniper berries. Check out these great pictures that Bob Bonin captured on Wednesday.

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A hermit thrush peers from behind a branch. Draper Twin Lake Park, October 25, 2017.
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The hermit thrush shows off its throat and breast, highlighting the crisp dark-brown chocolate drops on a clean, white background that fade toward the belly. The warm reddish-brown tail also helps us identify this bird.

 

Nearby, White-Throated Sparrows bounced around in the thick brush, occasionally popping up to show off their clean white bibs and the splashes of yellow in front of their eyes.

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This White-throated Sparrow shows off the beautiful colors and patterns on its head.

Before I started learning about birds a few years ago, I didn’t even know these species existed. But now I look forward to seeing these old friends each spring and fall, messengers of the changing season.

 

Photo of the Week: Phragmites Progress at Gallagher Creek Park

Human memory is a funny thing. We like to create our own versions of events in our minds, so when I need to track progress over time, I know that it’s important to have a separate, objective record. We regularly use photo monitoring to document changes in the natural communities in our parks. Most of the photo monitoring points were established in 2011, so we have about 7 years of photographic records. Not a long record, but long enough to see big changes in areas where we are doing active land management.

Check out this series of pictures from Gallagher Creek Park. These photos illustrate the growth of Phragmites patches until they were treated in 2014. We have done follow-up treatment every year. When I check each Phragmites patch before treatment, I am a little frustrated when I see Phragmites resprouts. But these photos remind me how far we’ve come. We plan to wrap up Phragmites treatment in our parks next week, so expect to see (or not see) smaller Phragmites patches in the future!

Photo Point GCP03: Looking west on Silver Bell Road

The large willow tree on the left side is a good reference point.

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Photo point GCP03. August 30, 2011.
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Photo point GCP03. July 16, 2012.
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Photo point GCP03. September 4, 2013.
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Photo point GCP03. August 28, 2014.
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Photo Point GCP03. September 14, 2016.
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Photo Point GCP03. September 6, 2017.