Tag Archives: Birds

This Week at Bear Creek: Bear Creek Begins to Bloom

Blog post and photos by Cam Mannino
Blog post and photos by Cam Mannino

Look for this feature early each week! Cam Mannino shares her latest observations, photos, and inspirations from Bear Creek Nature Park. Don’t forget to check out the Preview of Coming Attractions at the bottom of the post to see what you should be looking for in the coming weeks. Thanks Cam!


April 12-18: Bear Creek Begins to Bloom

This week the earliest woodland flowers took advantage of the pale sunlight filtering through bare branches and bloomed. Please help children understand not to pick flowers in our parks; we want them to prosper, seed and keep spreading!

The first to arise, as usual, were the native Spring Beauties (Claytonia), thrusting slender, grass-like leaves through the soil beneath large trees, followed by delicate white flowers with fine pink stripes. Look for them on the western edge of the path through the western woods.

Spring beauty and moss make a wonderful green splash after a long winter
Spring beauty and moss make a wonderful green splash after a long winter

Another early riser is our native Blood Root (Sanguinaria canadensis), named for its use as a dye by native basket makers. This elegant little plant emerges wrapped in an almost circular leaf cloak, after which the small, white flower with a bright yellow center opens to the sun and the leaf unfolds. I tracked its progress over 3 days under a large tree left of the path near the Gunn Road end of the marsh. A large patch of Blood Root also appears every year among fallen trees on the western side of the long loop behind the center pond. But be quick; these very early spring flowers usually last only a few days!

Bloodroot leaves emerging
Bloodroot leaves emerging
A flower bud hides in the emerging bloodroot leaves.
A flower bud hides in the emerging bloodroot leaves.
The flower of blood root fully open.
The flower of blood root fully open.

The more odiferous and sturdy native, Skunk Cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus), nosed its way out of marsh mud at the southern edge of the western woods. Look down from the eastern side of the bridge built there for us by an Eagle Scout. If you get too close, whew! They do like to make a stink each spring but that’s how they attract fly pollinators and discourage would-be foragers!

Skunk cabbage leaves poke through the leaves
Skunk cabbage leaves poke through the leaves

Over in the marsh, two fighting Muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus) staged a splashing chase scene for me, but I was only able to catch a photo of one swimming away in its blue wake.

A muskrat steaming along
A muskrat steaming along

A day later it was turtle fest again. Five Painted Turtles (Chrysemys picta) basked on a log in the center pond, lined up by size as if they were the VonTrapp family!

Five turtles line up on a log at Bear Creek Nature Park.
Five turtles line up on a log at Bear Creek Nature Park.

And the same day, a large Common Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina) cruised the marsh, eating underwater plants, its long neck stretching up periodically for air. Watch for what looks like a lump of mud moving slowly in the water, with the turtle’s beak-like snout emerging separately just ahead. Like this:

A snapping turtle swims with its head just above the water
A snapping turtle swims with its head just above the water

Two days later on the large loop, I very carefully approached another snapper, which was probably seeking a place to lay eggs. She wisely sought a better location since there was no disturbed earth the next day. Don’t get too close! These big turtles are crabby on land and can quickly extend their necks which can be as long as their carapace. They snap with powerful jaws, because unlike other turtles, they are too big to pull into their shells. The snapper’s ancestors lived at the time of the dinosaurs and they look it, don’t they?

A big snapping turtle on a path. Maybe looking for a nesting site.
A big snapping turtle on a path. Maybe looking for a nesting site.

The female Red-winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) have now joined their flashier mates in the marsh.

A female red-winged blackbird
A female red-winged blackbird

A Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus ) drummed for a mate nearby. The males are red from the nape of the neck to the bill like the one below. The females have a red nape patch that stops at the back of the head. Not to be confused with the Red-headed Woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus), like the cartoon Woody, whose neck and head is completely red and whose plumage is very different.

A red-bellied woodpecker perches on  a tree
A red-bellied woodpecker perches on a tree

Previews of Coming Attractions!

Let’s see if these Trout Lily leaves (Erythronium ) near the Gunn Road entrance produce any beautiful yellow flowers. It’s been years since they have, but maybe the prescribed burn will help them out this year. It bloomed after a previous burn!

Mottled trout lily leaves soak up sunlight.
Mottled trout lily leaves soak up sunlight.
This trout lily, a native flower, bloomed after a prescribed burn in 2008
This trout lily, a native flower, bloomed after a prescribed burn in 2008

A May Apple (Podophyllum) sprout and drooping unopened leaf emerged in a sunny spot next to the path. In May, a white flower will bloom shaded under the fully open umbrella leaf, to be followed by an inedible “apple.”

Mayapple leaves unfurl from the ground
Mayapple leaves unfurl from the ground

Sunday morning, a North American Raccoon (Procyon lotor) snoozed in this tree on the western-most path through the woods, only a small slice of fur visible at the bottom of the hole until my camera clicked. Keep watch here – by the end of May, baby raccoons may clamber around inside the hole as they have most years. I recommend whispering and staying on the path with binoculars or she and the young will disappear farther up inside the hole.

The racoon hole
The racoon hole

Come explore spring in Bear Creek yourself and please let us know about your discoveries in the comment section below.

New Weekly Feature! Check out “This Week at Bear Creek”

Look for this feature early each week! Cam Mannino shares her latest observations, photos, and inspirations from Bear Creek Nature Park. Thanks Cam!


 This Week at Bear Creek

By Volunteer Park Steward, Cam Mannino

Cam at Bear Creek Nature Park.
Cam at Bear Creek Nature Park.

Welcome to the first post for “This Week at Bear Creek.” As a long time BC walker and photographer, I’ve long considered a narrative photo blog with that title. So I’m happy that Dr. Ben has offered the idea a home here in the Notebook. I’ll try to keep you informed about the abundant wildlife and plants in the park as well as stewardship opportunities and other events. The plan is to post once a week in the spring, summer and fall (with a hiatus or two for Real Life and vacations) and a bit less in the winter when the park is quieter and walking’s more challenging. So let’s begin with:

March 29 – April 4, 2015

Last Wednesday I accompanied Ben and Sigrid Grace, an enthusiastic birder, on a bird walk through Bear Creek. We saw 25 bird species that early morning, so I’ll focus on bird arrivals and departures this week.

Ben and Sigrid at Bear Creek Nature Park, April 1, 2015.
Ben and Sigrid at Bear Creek Nature Park, April 1, 2015.

As we entered the park, Ben spotted a red fox running at full lope across the field toward the woods, his tail streaming behind him. Too fast for a photo that day but here’s a photo of a red fox at a trot from 2013.

Red fox (Vulpes vulpes) on the run.
Red fox (Vulpes vulpes) on the run.

Spring migration is off to a great start. The Song Sparrow’s arrived and is already singing with gusto.

Song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) singing.
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) singing.

Ben heard the rattling call of a Sandhill Crane.

Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis) at Bear Creek Marsh
Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis) at Bear Creek Marsh

A Great Blue Heron flew high overhead, perhaps just back from its winter stay on the Florida or Gulf coast.

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) flying. In flight herons have their neck bent in an “s” shape, while sandhill cranes hold their neck straight.
Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) flying. In flight herons have their neck bent in an “s” shape, while sandhill cranes hold their neck straight.

And the Common Grackles with their white eyes, iridescent blue heads and rusty-gate voices are tilting their beaks skyward in an attempt to establish a pecking order.

Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) posturing.
Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) posturing.

Red-winged Blackbirds trill, Canada Geese honk and Mallard Ducks cackle in the marsh near Gunn Road, establishing their territories among the reeds.

Red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoenicius) trilling.
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoenicius) trilling.

We saw a large flock of Cedar Waxwings fluttering between bushes and trees. No way of knowing whether these elegant birds spent the winter here or just rode in on the south wind the night before.

Cedar waxwing (Bombycillia cedrorum)
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycillia cedrorum).

Soon the Dark-eyed Juncos will be leaving for Canadian forests and the modest Tree Sparrows will be heading to Canada’s far north to build their nests of ptarmigan feathers on the tundra.

Human visitors will notice that the Eastern parts of the Oak-Hickory Forest near Gunn Road received a “prescribed burn” the previous week. This professionally controlled, slow-moving, low burn discourages invasive plants and trees like Autumn Olive and Buckthorn. Be patient and in a few short weeks, all that black ash, full of nutrients, will nourish new growth. The thin spring sunlight filtering through the bare limbs should bring us more Spring Beauties and Blood Root, two of the earliest and most beautifully delicate spring woodland flowers. We’ll let you know when they began to emerge.

Thanks for sharing This Week at Bear Creek.   If questions occur to you, comment below and I’ll try to find answers. And of course, please share your week at Bear Creek in the comments as well.

Friday Photos: Sparkling Snow, Beautiful Blue Skies, and Winter Birds

When  clear, deep blue stretches across the sky in Michigan in January, it is time to get outside. Fortunately, our weekly Wednesday bird walks offered a great excuse to do just that. We started out at Bear Creek Nature Park on January 7 on a chilly morning. The walk began quietly, but as the sun rose birds began to move and call until we were busy hunting down the sources of loud hammering, persistent chip notes, and musical calls. Fresh snow on the ground captured the path of a small mammal forging through the snow.

Paths in the winter snow at Bear Creek Nature Park.
Paths in the winter snow at Bear Creek Nature Park.

On January 14 at Cranberry Lake Park we were treated to a thick frost covering the surface of every twig. Ice crystals hanging suspended in the frigid air sparkled as the sun filled them with light. In addition to many of the usual birds we were treated to the calls of a Great Horned Owl in the distance.

Sun shines through sparkling ice crystals long the shore of Cranberry Lake at Cranberry Lake Park
Sun shines through sparkling ice crystals long the shore of Cranberry Lake at Cranberry Lake Park

The third Wednesday of January we birded in a snow squall at Lost Lake Nature Park, so I didn’t get any pictures. But this past Wednesday, January 28 at Draper Twin Lake Park was another morning with beautiful blue skies. I snapped this picture as we tried to locate some pesky birds hiding in the underbrush along the eastern wetland.

Animal tracks mark the snow and vapor trails from jets cross the sun. People and animals still need to get places when it is cold!
Animal tracks mark the snow and vapor trails from jets cross the sun. People and animals still need to get places when it is cold!

We’ll be out birding again in February. Remember that I do have a few pairs of extra binoculars that you can borrow for the bird walks. If the weather is nice I usually stick around after the bird walk to remove invasive shrubs for a few hours. You’re welcome to join me. Check out the January Bird Report if you’re interested in the complete list of birds we were able to identify this month. Hope to see you out there next week!