Tag Archives: Paint Creek Trail

Volunteers needed for June 4 Garlic Mustard Pull along the Paint Creek Trail!

  • What: Garlic Mustard Pull along the Paint Creek Trail to celebrate National Trails Day
  • Why: To help control invasive plants, keep the trail beautiful, and connect with other cool people!
  • When: June 4, 2016. Meet at 9 am at the Paint Creek Cider Mill to get instructions, pull garlic mustard 9:30 am – 12:30 pm. Lunch provided to all participants after!
  • Where: Meet at the Paint Creek Cider Mill, 4480 Orion Rd at 9 am. Groups will then go to different sites.
  • Register: http://paintcreektrail.org/wordpress/garlic-mustard-pull
  • Questions? Email manager@paintcreektrail.org for more information.IMG_2593

Keep the Paint Creek Trail Beautiful

To celebrate National Trails Day®, volunteers are needed for a Garlic Mustard Pull along the Paint Creek Trail on Saturday, June 4, 2016 from 9:30am-12:30pm (meet at 9 am to get instructions).  Garlic Mustard is a biennial, invasive plant with a two year life cycle that grows in shady areas, and in full sun.  It affects biodiversity and forest health by spreading quickly and preventing native plants from growing.  It is often spread by humans, bird, deer, and other wildlife. “Garlic mustard is a serious threat to our natural communities. If allowed to spread, this invasive plant forms dense stands that crowd out native plants, like trilliums and other spring flowers that we love so much. Each garlic mustard plant can produce thousands of seeds that can wait in the soil for years, allowing it to invade both disturbed areas and mature healthy forests. The most common method for controlling garlic mustard is to hand pull second year plants, preventing seed production. Taking the time to remove a few plants before they spread will save a lot of work in the future,” said Dr. Ben VanderWeide, Natural Areas Stewardship Manager for Oakland Township Parks and Recreation.

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The second year plants in this picture have triangular, toothed leaves and a cluster of small, four-petaled, white flowers. The seeds fruit into long pods that dry and burst, shooting the seeds up to three feet! If you notice the pods are starting to open, it’s time to stop pulling or you risk spreading seeds all over.

Everyone is Welcome!

“Volunteer Pulls are an effective way of preventing the spread of Garlic Mustard on the Paint Creek Trail. It needs to be bagged and thrown away, because it can easily re-root if left on the ground.  In addition, it cannot be composted because the compost piles do not get hot enough to break it down.  Burning doesn’t always destroy the seeds either,” said Trail Manager Kristen Myers.  The Paint Creek Trailways Commission will have volunteer sites in Rochester, Rochester Hills, Oakland Township, and Orion Township for the pull.  Instruction and all supplies will be provided, and all ages are welcome.  IMG_2591

Volunteers will meet at the Paint Creek Cider Mill, 4480 Orion Road, Oakland Township, MI 48306 starting at 9:00am to get their supplies and directions to the sites.  In addition, lunch will be provided for all participants.  “This is a great way to celebrate National Trails Day.  The Paint Creek Trail is the first non-motorized rail-to-trail in the State of Michigan, and is known for its natural beauty.  Our trail users take ownership of the trail, and want to do what they can to keep it beautiful,” said Jim VanDoorn, President, Friends of the Paint Creek Trail.  The Paint Creek Trailways Commission will be reporting how many bags they pull to The Stewardship Network as part of their Garlic Mustard Challenge 2016 (https://www.stewardshipnetwork.org/garlic-mustard-challenge).  Interested volunteers can register online at http://paintcreektrail.org/wordpress/garlic-mustard-pull or can email manager@paintcreektrail.org for more information.

Prairie Flowers: A Changing Mosaic of Color

It’s too easy to just visit an area once and think you know it. Visit your favorite woods, stream, or prairie once a week this summer and really pay attention to what you see. It is always changing.

I was reminded of this constant change while preparing for upcoming invasive shrub removal at the Paint Creek Heritage Area Wet Prairie. I couldn’t find the blue-eyed grass I’d noticed a week earlier, and the prairie grasses were growing quickly! What I really enjoyed, though, were the new flowers that had opened, spreading swaths of new color into the patchwork of the prairie.

The first yellow flowers of shrubby cinquefoil (Dasiphora fruticosa) had just emerged, foretelling a golden show in the coming week. You might recognize this attractive shrub because it is sometimes used in landscaping. Shrubby cinquefoil is fairly common just beyond the park sign along the Paint Creek Trail, so you won’t have to look very hard to find it.

Shrubby cinquefoil (Dasiphora fruticosa) is a low shrub that is found in open, wet ground in high quality natural areas.
Shrubby cinquefoil (Dasiphora fruticosa) is a low shrub that is found in open, wet ground in high quality natural areas.

Pale purple spikes dotted the prairie. This species was a new one for me – my best guess is pale spiked lobelia (Lobelia spicata), but let me know if think otherwise! The “3+2” pattern of the petals resembled the close relative cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis): notice the 3 bottom lobes of petals and the 2 top lobes. The delicate purple flowers seemed to be more abundant in slightly disturbed areas.

Pale spike lobelia (Lobelia spicata) splashed delicate color throughout the prairie. Another flower that should be easy to spot if you get out to the wet prairie this week.
Pale spiked lobelia (Lobelia spicata) splashed delicate color throughout the prairie. Another flower that should be easy to spot if you get out to the wet prairie this week.

I’d noticed hairy beard-tongue a week or so earlier, but I can’t resist showing it to you. Like a lot of  common names, hairy beard-tongue is a rough translation of the Latin name, Penstemon hirsutus. Scientists were very descriptive when they named these plants! Hairy beard-tongue likes sandy, open ground, including prairies and the oak barrens that used to be abundant in this area.

Hairy beard-tongue is an attractive plant and does well in landscaping. Help out native pollinators and add some flair to your flower beds!
Hairy beard-tongue is an attractive plant and does well in landscaping. Help out native pollinators and add some flair to your flower beds!
If you look closely at hairy beard-tongue (Penstemon hirsutus), you'll notice what looks like a hairy tongue coming out of the middle of the flower.
If you look closely at hairy beard-tongue (Penstemon hirsutus), you’ll notice what looks like a hairy tongue coming out of the middle of the flower.

Lastly, butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) is getting ready to pop! Next week we’ll have a glorious display of deep orange milkweed flowers all along the Paint Creek Trail north of Silverbell. Don’t miss it!

The orange of the butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) flowers is beginning to color the flower buds.
The orange of the butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) flowers is beginning to color the flower buds.

Let me know if you see these plants flowering at Paint Creek Heritage Area – Wet Prairie, or if you see something new!